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Full text of "Eleventh Annual Catalogue of the East Carolina Teachers Training School, 1919-1920"

3 7- 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Joyner Library, East Carolina University 



http://www.archive.org/details/eleventhannualca1 1 east 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS 
TRAINING SCHOOL 



GREENVILLE, N. C. 



1919-1920 



RALEIGH 

Edwards & Brotjghton Printing Co. 

1920 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendars 4-5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Faculty 7 

Officers 8 

General Information 9-18 

Requirements for Admission and Outline of Courses 19-22 

Department of Instruction 23-33 

Expenses 34 

Students' Roll 35-45 



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CALENDAR 1920-1921 

Sept. 29, 1920. Wednesday — Registration of matriculated students. 

Sept. 30, Thursday — Matriculation of new students. 

Oct. 1, Friday — Regular work begins. 

Nov. 25, Thursday — Thanksgiving. 

Dec. 23, Thursday — Fall Term ends. Christmas recess begins. 

Jan. 6, 1921. Thursday — School work is resumed. Winter Term 
begins. 

Mar. 19, Saturday — Winter Term ends. 

Mar. 22, Tuesday — Spring Term begins. 

June 5 to June 8, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday — 
Commencement Exercises. 

June 14, Tuesday — Summer Term begins. 

Aug. 6, Saturday — Summer Term ends. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Congressional Term 

District Expires 

F. C. Harding, Greenville First 1925 

J. B. Lee, Elizabeth City First 1923 

A. McDowell, Scotland Neck Second 1925 

Y. T. Oemond, Kinston Second 1923 

D. L. Waed, New Bern Third 1925 

J. R. Bannerman, Burgaw Third 1923 

J. W. Hines, Rocky Mount Fourth 1921 

R. B. White, Wake Forest Fourth 1921 

M. B. McAuley, Acme Sixth 1921 

E. C Beooks, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

E. C. Brooks, 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Ex officio Chairman. 

C. W. Wilson, Secretary. 

J. B. Spilman, Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Y. T. Oemond, Chairman. 
F. C. Harding, Secretary. E. C. Brooks. 



FACULTY 

ROBT. H. WRIGHT, B.S., 

President. 

CLAUDE W. WILSON, A.B., 

Pedagogy. 

S. B. UNDERWOOD, A.B., 

School Management. 

H. G. SWANSON, A.B., 

Supervisor of Practice. 

LEON R. MEADOWS, A.B., A.M., 

English. 
MAMIE E. JENKINS, A.B., A.M., 

English. 

ISALLIE JOYNER DAVIS, 

History. 

ELLA V. RICKER, 
History. 

HERBERT E. AUSTIN, B.S., 

Science. 

ALICE V. WILSON, B.S., 

Science. 
CARRIE G. SCOBEY, B.S. r 

Household Economics. 

MARIA D. GRAHAM, B.S., 

Mathematics. 

JMABEL M. COMFORT, A.B., A.M., 

Mathematics. 

BIRDIE McKINNEY, 

Mathematics. 
ANNIE RAY, B.S., 

Primary Education. 

NELLIE MAUPIN, B.S., 

History and Pedagogy. 

*H. B. SMITH, A.B., 
English. 

*J. H. ALLEN, 

Mathematics. 

*A. M. PROCTOR, 

History. 

*ELIZABETH BOGLE, B.S., 

Domestic Science. 

KATE W. LEWIS, 
Drawing. 

MAY R. B. MUFFLY, 
Public School Music and Voice. 

HANNA H. FAHNESTOCK, 
Piano. 



*Summer Term only. 
{Absent on leave. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 

MARY BERTOLET, 

Piano. 

DORA E. MEAD, 

Piano. 

*EDNA B. MILLER, 

Piano. 

MIRIAM MacFADYEN, 

Principal Model School. 
Critic Teacher, First Grade. 

LI DA TAYLOR, 

Critic Teacher, Second Grade. 

JJAGNES WHITESIDE, 
Critic Teacher, Third Grade. 
MARTHA LANCASTER, 

Critic Teacher, Third Grade. 

NELLIE WYMAN, 
Critic Teacher, Fourth Grade. 

MRS. VIRGIE LEE AUMILLER, 

Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade. 

ANNIE M. MoCOWEN, B.S., 
Critic Teacher, Sixth Grade. 

LOUISE GOGGIN, 

Critic Teacher, Seventh Grade. 

*SALLIE HAMMETT, 

Critic Teacher. 

*MAUDE BEATTY, 

Writing. 

ANNIE SMAW, 

Joyner School, Principal. 

MRS. LOUELLA LANCASTER STANCILL, 

Joyner School, Intermediate Grades. 

LIZZIE SMITH, 

Joyner School, Primary Grades. 

MRS. LEON R. MEADOWS, 

Joyner School, Piano. 



OFFICERS 

Robt. H. Wright President 

Mrs. Kate R. Beckwith Lady Principal 

Chas. O'H. Laughinghouse Physician 

Mittie R. Beaman Superintendent of Infirmary 

Willa M. Ray Secretary to President 

Ola S. Ross Custodian of Records 

J. B. Spilman Bursar 

Mrs. Nannie F. Jeter Matron 

Arley Moore Dormitory Matron 

C. W. Wilson Director of Summer Term 

*Summer Term only. {Absent on leave. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The East Carolina Teachers Training School was estab- 
lished by Act of the General Assembly, ratified the 8 th day 
of March, 1907. The General Assembly of 1911 rechartered 
the School. The following is the charter : 

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT TO CHARTER THE EAST 
CAROLINA TEACHERS TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section 1. That the trustees of the East Carolina Teachers Train- 
ing School, established by an act of the General Assembly of North 
Carolina of one thousand nine hundred and seven, and located at 
Greenville, North Carolina, shall be and are hereby constituted a 
body corporate by and under the name and style of "The Board of 
Trustees of the East Carolina Teachers Training School," and by 
that name may sue and be sued, make contracts, acquire real and 
personal property by gift, purchase or devise, and exercise such 
other rights and privileges as are incident to corporations of like 
character as are necessary for the proper administration of said 
school. 

Sec. 2. That said board of trustees shall be composed of nine per- 
sons, together with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, as 
chairman ex officio, said trustees to be appointed by the State Board 
of Education: Provided, that two members of said board shall be 
from the First Congressional District, two from the Second, two 
from the Third, two from the Fourth, and one from the Sixth, whose 
term of office shall be six years. That the State Board of Education, 
upon the expiration of the term of office of any member of the board 
of trustees, shall appoint his successor for the full term of six years. 
Vacancies occurring by death or resignation of any member of this 
board shall be filled by appointment of the State Board of Education 
for the unexpired term. All trustees shall take oath to perform 
faithfully their duties, and shall hold office until their successors 
have been duly appointed and qualified. 

Sec. 3. That the said school shall be maintained by the State 
for the purpose of giving to young white men and women such edu- 
cation and training as shall fit and qualify them to teach in the 
public schools of North Carolina. 

Sec. 4. That the board of trustees shall have power to prescribe 
the course of study and shall lay special emphasis on those sub- 
jects taught in the public schools of the State and on the art and 
science of teaching. 



10 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Sec. 5. That tuition in said school shall be free to those who 
signify their intention to teach, for such time and upon such condi- 
tions as may be prescribed by the board of trustees; and the board 
of trustees, upon the recommendation of the faculty, shall give those 
students in said school who have completed the prescribed course of 
study, a diploma of graduation; and they may upon the recommenda- 
tion of the faculty grant certificates of proficiency for the comple- 
tion of special courses. 

Sec. 6. That when, in the judgment of the board of trustees, the 
best interest of the school will be promoted thereby the board may 
decline to admit young men into the rooms of the dormitories. 

Sec. 7. That all rights and titles heretofore acquired in any way 
for the use and benefit of said Training Shool shall vest and remain 
in the said board of trustees as herein incorporated. 

Sec. 8. That the trustees shall report biennially to the Governor, 
before the meeting of each General Assembly, the operation and con- 
dition of said school. 

Sec. 9. That this act shall be in force from and after its ratifi- 
cation. 

Ratified this the 8th day of March, A. D. 1911. 



LOCATION 

The school is located in the town of Greenville, Pitt County, 
ISTorth Carolina, on a tract of fifty acres of land. The site is 
well-nigh ideal; part of the land is covered with a growth of 
native trees. This woodland furnishes a fine setting for the 
buildings and is full of attractive walks and nooks for the stu- 
dents. The school is situated on a hill and the sloping lawn 
makes a beautiful front campus. Greenville is at the junction 
of the ISTorfolk Southern and the Weldon-Kinston Branch of the 
Atlantic Coast Line and is therefore accessible from all direc- 
tions. 

HISTORY 

July 2, 1908, ground was first broken. The following build- 
ings have been erected : East Dormitory, West Dormitory, Ad- 
ministration Building, Kitchen and Dining Hall, Laundry and 
Power Plant, Infirmary, President's Residence, and the Model 
School. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 



11 



October 5, 1909, the school opened its doors for students. 
Since that date 6,053 students have been enrolled, as follows : 





Regular 
School 
Year 


Summer 


Total 


Names 

Counted 

Twice 


Net 
Enrollment 


1909-1910 


174 
227 
235 
252 
251 
295 
295 
307 
325 
278 
285 


330 
300 
359 
322 
328 
394 
398 
353 
273 
286 


504 
527 
594 
574 
579 
689 
691 
660 
598 
564 
285 


42 
29 
26 
20 
19 
16 
20 
15 
12 
20 


462 


1910-1911 --- 


498 


1911-1912 -.- 


568 


1912-1913 


554 


1913-1914 


560 


1914-1915 


673 


1915-1916 


671 


1916-1917 


645 


1917-1918 


586 


1918-1919 . - 


551 


1919-1920 


285 








2,924 


6,265 


6,053 











The total number of students enrolled since the school first 
began is 6,265. Not counting any student's name twice in 
twelve months, the net enrollment is 6,053'. 

The number of graduates is as follows : 



1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 



18 


1915 


19 


1916 


30 


1917 


36 


1918 




1919 



46 

48 
51 

74 

77 



AIM 

As is seen in the act of the General Assembly, section 3, 
the object of the State in establishing and maintaining the 
school is to give "to young white men and women such edu- 
cation and training as shall fit and qualify them to teach 
in the public schools of North Carolina." 

This is a professional school. Its aim is to teach its stu- 
dents not only subject-matter, but also the processes by which 
the learning-mind acquires knowledge. Its purpose is to give 
the students: 

1. Such knowledge of the studies taught in the public schools 
as a teacher must have in order to teach them properly. 

2. Such knowledge of other studies that are so related to the 
branches taught in the public schools as will give a proper un- 
derstanding of the public school branches. 

3. A knowledge of the mental and physical powers of the 
child and their methods of development. 



12 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

4. A knowledge of the principles of education and methods 
of teaching. 

5. The practical application of these principles in the actual 
work of the schoolroom by practice-teaching. 

6. A knowledge of the methods of organizing and managing 
schools. 

7. A knowledge of the school law of the State. 

In brief, this institution aims to prepare teachers, both theo- 
retically and practically, for teaching the public schools of North 
Carolina. 

DISCIPLINE 

In conducting a school for young men and women who are 
about to assume the responsibilities of so serious and dignified 
a profession as teaching, there should be no occasion for arbi- 
trary and iron-clad rules. Each student should attend promptly 
and faithfully to every duty and have due consideration and 
regard for the rights and privileges of others. 

]NTo rules are made by the school authorities except those 
necessary to govern routine work, but if the pupil is found to 
be falling behind in his studies, neglecting his duties or exerting 
an unwholesome influence, prompt steps are taken for his 
amendment. If a pupil does not show some disposition to con- 
form to high standards he can hardly be considered good ma- 
terial for a teacher; and if he is found unresponsive to patient 
endeavors to bring him into the proper attitude to his duties, he 
is requested to resign his place in the school. Every effort is 
made to lead the students to choose the right, and the results 
have been wholly satisfactory. 

In the spirit of the institution is found the discipline of the 
school. 

DORMITORIES AND ROOMS 

The school is equipped with dormitory space for two hun- 
dred and forty students. Each dormitory room is provided 
with two single iron beds, with springs, mattresses and pillows, 
two chairs, a table, a washstand, a bureau and a wardrobe — all 
the necessary furniture for comfortable living. 

There is a central heating and lighting plant that provides 
steam heat and electric lights for all the buildings. A modern 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 13 

system of ventilation is installed. The plumbing, draining and 
all those things necessary for good sanitary conditions are of the 
best type procurable. The school gets its water from the town 
of Greenville. The town owns its waterworks and has the 
water examined frequently, thus insuring its purity. In short, 
the school life of each student is made as comfortable as can 
be, and every possible precaution for health is taken. 

The health conditions in this school, from the first, have been 
entirely satisfactory. During the eleven years of the school's 
existence there has never been a death. 

STUDENT'S OUTFIT 

Each student is expected to bring for his own use the fol- 
lowing articles : Two pairs of sheets, one pair of blankets, two 
white counterpanes, two pillow-cases, six towels, six table nap- 
kins, a spoon and a glass. 

Only single beds are used. 

All articles to be sent to the laundry should be plainly 
marked with indelible ink. 

CULINARY DEPARTMENT 

The school dining room is perhaps the most attractive hall 
in the institution. The equipment in the kitchen is modern 
in every sense. For the preservation of meats, vegetables and 
other foodstuffs, the school has established a refrigerating plant 
of the best type. The matron is a trained dietitian and each 
menu is made out with much care — the object being to pro- 
vide for the student body the most wholesome food and to see 
that this food is prepared in the best way possible. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The school physician pays daily visits to the institution. A 
resident nurse is in charge of the Infirmary. This building is 
equipped with all the necessary furniture. Heating, lighting, 
plumbing, and ventilation are modern. 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

In the Administration Building are to be found the school 
offices, Library, Chemical and Physical Laboratory, Biology 
Laboratory, fifteen recitation rooms, nine music rooms, a stock 



14 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

room, the postoffice, cooking and sewing laboratories, the As- 
sembly Hall, Y. W. C. A. Hall and the Recreation Hall. Each 
room is well equipped and ventilated. The Assembly Hall has 
a seating capacity of eight hundred. Here the devotional exer- 
cises are held daily. 

THE LAUNDRY AND POWER PLANT 

The laundry and the power plant are under the same roof. 
The equipment here, as in the other buildings, is of the best 
possible type. The laundry has all of the necessary equipment 
for efficient laundry work. 

The power plant supplies sufficient power for heating and 
lighting the school and for refrigeration. There are two sets of 
units, so that if one is out of commission the other may be used, 
thus preventing inconvenience, as well as saving wear and tear 
on machinery. There is also a gas machine to supply the cook- 
ing laboratory with gas. 

MODEL SCHOOL 

The Model School building is a modern school building, two 
stories high, which contains eight classrooms. The equipment 
is up-to-date. The stairways are in fire towers at each end of 
the building. 

THE JOTNER SCHOOL 

The Joyner School is a rural three-teacher school, three miles 
from Greenville, in the midst of a typical North Carolina farm- 
ing community. 

LIBRARY 

The school has a well-selected pedagogical and reference li- 
brary. A good collection of standard fiction and many bulletins, 
magazines, and newspapers are available to all students. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL QUARTERLY 

The Training School Quarterly is an educational magazine 
published by the school with a twofold purpose: to present 
important educational questions of the day, and to record what 
this school is doing. The school publishes no bulletins except 
reprints from this. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 15 

ORGANIZATIONS 

The attitude of the school toward organizations is to en- 
courage those that are intended to preserve health, develop 
character and the spirit of democracy. 

Athletics. 

The students are provided with a basketball ground, six tennis 
courts, and a volley-ball court. They are encouraged to take a 
sufficient amount of outdoor exercise to insure good health. 

Tennis and basketball clubs have been organized by the 
students, and although no games have been played with out- 
side institutions, yet much good has been derived through the 
friendly contests held on the campus. A cross-country walking 
club has been one of the features in athletics. These sports are 
encouraged not only for the physical training that is gained 
through them, but for the contributions which they make toward 
character-building. On the athletic field the student gains the 
power of self-control — a most valuable asset to every person who 
expects to become a teacher. 

Literary Societies. 

One of the chief factors in the development of both the social 
and educational life of the student may be found in the Literary 
Societies. The Edgar Allan Poe and the Sidney Lanier So- 
cieties, established in 1910, have done much toward unifying the 
student-body and encouraging school spirit. 

The chief purposes of these societies are: to foster apprecia- 
tion of literature, music, and art; to develop initiative among 
the students; to enable them to obtain proficiency in parliamen- 
tary usage ; and to bring large numbers of them together in social 
intercourse. The societies meet twice a month. The programs 
are such as to maintain a high standard in literature, dramatics, 
debating, and music. The annual debate is one of the most im- 
portant events in the life of the school. The societies have given 
excellent entertainments to the public, and bring to the school 
lecturers and musicians of note each year. 

Young Women's Christian Association. 

The religious interests of the school are centered in the 
Young Women's Christian Association. This association was 



16 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

organized in 1909, since which time it has done very effective 
work in promoting high ideals among the students. All stu- 
dents are urged to take an active part in this phase of the 
school's work. Regular devotional meetings are held and sev- 
eral different courses in Bible and mission study are given. 

This year more than fifty per cent of the students are enrolled 
in these classes. Clubs for the study of the Sunday School les- 
sons meet regularly. Every year this Association sends dele- 
gates to the Southern Student Conference, held at Blue Ridge, 
JSTorth Carolina, where methods are studied for the better prose- 
cution of the ensuing year's work. Last year four delegates 
were sent to this conference. 

The Association renders efficient aid in meeting new students 
and in the organization of the school at the opening of the Fall 
Term. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

In appreciation of what the Training School has done for 
them, and realizing the importance of such a donation, the 
graduating classes and the students of two Summer Terms have 
left with the school voluntary contributions to be lent to needy 
students. This fund is not entered with the current accounts 
of the school, but is handled as a trust fund on its own account 
in a separate book. 

It stands as follows : 

The Class of 1911 $ 112.50 

The Class of 1912 200.00 

Summer Term of 1912 45.00 

The Class of 1913 300.00 

The Class of 1914 210.00 

Summer Term of 1914 21.00 

The Class of 1915 200.00 

The Class of 1916 205.00 

The Class of 1917 400.00 

The Class of 1918 500.00 

The Class of 1919 500.00 



Total .$2,693.50 

The Student Loan Fund annually helps through school a num- 
ber of deserving students. 

The Pitt County Federation of Women's Clubs keeps three 
students in school each year. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 17 

The Sallie Southall Cotten Loan Fund of the North Carolina 
Federation of Women's Clubs has been the instrument of keep- 
ing in school two students a year since it was established in 
1913. 

The Delon Henry Abbott Memorial Loan Fund 

Mrs. Delon Henry Abbott, of Vandemere, N. C, has donated 
$2,500 to be used to establish the Delon Henry Abbott Memorial 
Loan Fund. The money is to be loaned to students, preferably 
from Pamlico County, and the interest paid by those who have 
borrowed the money will be used for a scholarship for a girl 
from Pamlico County. 

1. I, Mrs. Delon H. Abbott, do bequeath and give to the East Caro- 
lina Teachers Training School the sum of two thousand five hundred 
dollars ($2,500), to be known as the Delon Henry Abbott Memorial 
Loan Fund. 

2. That the executive officer of the Board of Trustees of the East 
Carolina Teachers Training School is empowered to lend the prin- 
cipal as follows: To young white women who are citizens of Pamlico 
County, upon the approval of the County Superintendent of Schools, 
or his successor in office: Provided, that if on the 15th day of Sep- 
tember of any year any of this fund should be on hand and not asked 
for by any Pamlico County woman, then the said officer is empowered 
to lend said fund to any deserving applicant. It is my wish, how- 
ever, that any woman receiving benefit from this fund who does not 
live in Pamlico County shall offer her services as a teacher to the 
school authorities of Pamlico County for two years, and everything 
being equal shall render this service: Provided further, that said 
fund shall always be loaned at a rate of interest less than the legal 
rate of interest for North Carolina. 

3. That the annual interest from said fund shall constitute the 
Delon Henry Abbott Scholarship, and shall be awarded to Pamlico 
County young women by a competitive examination, the questions 
to be prepared by the authorities of the Training School and the 
examination to be held by the public school authorities of Pamlico 
County at such time and place as the latter may designate. 

4. As it is my desire that this fund be used to stimulate public 
education in Pamlico County, therefore, any deserving white woman 
who is a student of the high schools, or public schools doing equiva- 
lent work, shall be eligible to stand this examination. It is desired, 
however, that the scholarship be used by the winner of this exami- 
nation during her senior year at the East Carolina Teachers Train- 
ing School. 



18 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

5. That if at any time any of the above-mentioned provisions can- 
not be put into operation, the Trustees of the East Carolina Teachers 
Training School are empowered to use this fund in such a way as 
to put into effect, as far as possible, the spirit of said provisions. It 
is my desire, however, that this fund shall be used each year, and 
that a report shall be made annually to the public school authorities 
of Pamlico County showing how the fund has been used and who 
have received benefits therefrom. 

Done this the 9th day of May, 1918, at Vandemere, N. C. 

DONATIONS AND GIFTS 

Other donations and many gifts have been left to the school 
by groups of students and organizations for the purpose of 
beautifying the buildings or the grounds, or for providing some 
equipment they have felt was especially needed. 

The Literary Societies contributed the oil portraits of the two 
men most closely associated with the establishment of the school. 
They also spent $500 for trees, plants, and shrubbery for the 
campus. 

Each Senior Class has planted something on the campus on 
Arbor Day. Other groups have planted and kept up flower beds. 

A number of the graduating classes and one-year classes have 
left gifts for interior decoration, such as pictures, a frieze, and 
plaster figures. There have been two gifts of stage scenery. One 
group of summer students left $52.50 for reference boohs for the 
Library. 

TEACHERS' REGISTRY 

To help the county superintendents and school trustees who 
desire to secure good teachers, and to help those students who 
complete the course to secure desirable positions, the school 
will recommend deserving men and women for positions. 

It is the purpose of the school in this matter to recommend 
only those students who have the scholarship and personality 
necessary to meet the demands of the given position. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND 
OUTLINE OF COURSES 



In order to carry out the aim of this school the following 
regular courses of instruction have been arranged and are 
offered by the school : 

(a) A Professional, or INTormal, Course. 

(b) An Academic Course. 

For Graduates of The Training School: 

(c) One- Year Course G. 

PROFESSIONAL COURSE 

The Professional Course requires the maturity and schol- 
arship equivalent to that attained by the graduates of a four 
years State High School, and the course suggested below de- 
mands these requirements. This course is open only to those 
students who have had work equivalent to that offered by a 
four years State High School. A foreign language is not re- 
quired for admission. 

To enter the Professional Course a student must hold a certifi- 
cate from a State High School in North Carolina, offering 
a four years course, or from a private or graded school giving 
equivalent preparation, or pass an examination on a course 
equivalent to that pursued in such schools, or have completed 
the Academic Course offered in this school. 

To be admitted to (a) or (b) a student must be sixteen 
years of age. 

To be admitted to (c) a student must be a graduate of the' 
Training School. 



20 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 



OUTLINE OF REGULAR COURSES 

PROFESSIONAL COURSE 

FIRST TEAS 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



English 7 — Literature 

Reading 3 

History 7 — American 3 

Science 7 — Hygiene and 

Sanitation 3 

JScience 8 — Seasonal 

Laboratory 2 

Pedagogy 1 — How to Study 4 
3— Child Study... 4 
{Home Economics — 

Cooking.. 2 

Public School Music 7 3 

Drawing 4 .2 

tSpelling 



26-hrs 



English 8 — Rhetoric 

Composition ..3 

History 8 — American 3 

Science 9 — Hygiene and 

Sanitation 3 

JScience 10 — Seasonal 

Laboratory. .2 
Pedagogy 2 — The Recita- 
tion ...4 

4— Child Study 4 
JHome Economics — 

Cooking.. 2 

Public School Music 8 3 

Drawing 5 2 

tSpelling 

26-hrs 



English 9 — Literature 

Grammar 3 

History 9 — Civics 3 

Science 11 — Geography. 3 

Science 12 — Nature Study.. 2 
Pedagogy 7 — Primary _ 

Education.. 4 

Math. 7— For Grade 5 4 

JHome Economics — 

Cooking.. 2 

Public School Music 9 3 

Drawing 6 2 

tSpelling- - 



26-hrs 



SECOND YEAR 



English 10— For Grades 4 

and 5... 3 

Math. 8— For Grades 4 

to 6 3 

History 10 — For Grades 4 

and 5 3 

Science 13 — Geography 3 

Pedagogy 5 — Psychology ...3 
8 — Primary 

Education 3 

•Teaching 

JHome Economics — 

Sewing.. 2 

Public School Music 10 3 

Drawing 7 2 

tSpelling 

25-hrs 



English 10— For Grades 4 

and 5 3 

Math. 8— For Grades 4 

to 6 3 

History 10 — For Grades 4 

and 5 3 

Science 13 — Geography 3 

Pedagogy 6— Psychology .3 
9 — Primary 

Education ..3 

•Teaching 

JHome Economics — 

Sewing. .2 
Public School Music 11 —3 

Drawing 8 2 

tSpelling 

25-hrs 



English 11— For Grades 6 

and 7.. 3 

Math. 9— For Grade 7 3 

History 11 — For Grades 6 

and 7 3 

Science 14 — Elementary 

Agriculture 3 

Pedagogy 10 — Rural Soci- 
ology. .3 

11— School 

Managem't.3 
JHome Economics — 

Sewing. .2 

Public School Music 12 3 

Drawing 9 2 

tSpelling 

25-hrs 



♦During the first and second terms of this year the class is divided into two sections. 
During the first term ; Section A goes to the model school and is excused from all other class 
work with the exception of Pedagogy 5 and 8, Music 10, and Drawing 7, while Section B 
takes the work as scheduled for the term with the exception of Teaching. Section B takes 
its practice work during the second term together with Pedagogy 6 and 9, Music 11, and 
Drawing 8, while Section A resumes class work as scheduled for the second term with the 
exception of Teaching. 

tTo be taken if the student is found deficient. See page 26. 

jPupils taking Piano may omit the course marked %. 

Note. — The figures following the subjects give the numbers of the recitation periods per 
week. Each recitation period is forty-five minutes long. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 



21 



THE ACADEMIC COURSE 

There are many students in North Carolina who do not 
have access to a good high school, but who desire to become 
teachers. To meet the needs of such students this school has 
provided a two-year Academic Course. To enter the first year 
of this course a student must hold a certificate showing that he 
has successfully completed the work of the second year of a 
State high school or the equivalent, or pass an examination 
upon a course equivalent to that. To enter the second year of 
this course a student must hold a certificate showing that he 
has successfully completed the third year of a State high school 
or the equivalent, or pass an examination upon a course equiva- 
lent to that. 

ACADEMIC COURSE 

FIRST TEAR 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



English 1 — Reading 5 

Math. 1 — Arithmetic 

Algebra 5 

History 1 — Ancient 5 

Science 1 — Principles of 

Geography 5 

{Music 1 3 

{Drawing 1 2 

•Spelling 



25-hrs 



English 2 — Literature 

Composition ..5 
Math. 2 — Arithmetic 

Algebra 

Geometry.-. -5 

History 2 — Ancient 5 

Science 2 — Economic 

Geography 5 

{Music 2 3 

{Drawing 2 2 

•Spelling 

25-hrs 



English 3 — Grammar 5 

Math. 3 — Algebra 5 

History 3 — Middle Ages 5 

Science 3 — Elementary 

Physics 5 

{Public School Music 3 3 

{Drawing 3. 2 

{Spelling 



25-hrs 



SECOND TEAR 



English 4 — Literature 

Composition 

Rhetoric 5 

Math. 4 — Arithmetic 
Algebra 

Geometry 5 

History 4— Mediaeval 5 

Science 4 — Applied 

Biologv 5 

{Public School Music 4 3 

{Basketry.. 2 

•Spelling 



25-hrs 



English 5 — Literature 

Composition 

Rhetoric 5 

Math. 5 — Geometry 5 

History 5 — Mod. Europe._5 
Science 5 — Applied 

Physics 5 

{Public School Music 5 3 

{Basketry 2 

•Spelling 



25-hrs 



English 6 — Literature 

Composition 

Rhetoric 5 

Math. 6 — Geometry 5 

History 6 — Mod. Europe. „5 
Science 6 — Applied 

Biology 5 

{Public School Music 6 3 

{Basketry 2 

•Spelling _. 



25-hrs 



*To be taken if the student is found deficient. Sec page 26 
{Pupils taking Piano omit these courses. 



22 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 



GRADUATE COURSE 
One-Year Course G 

To meet the demands of those students who have received a 
diploma from this school and who wish to pursue their work 
further, the following course is offered : 



*Gi 



*G 2 



*Q3 



ACADEMIC 

Eng. — Amer. Literature 4 

Hist.— (a) Mod. Eu. Hist 4 

(b) U. S. Hist, since 

1865 4 

Sci. — (a) Geog. for 4 and 5 

Grades 4 

(b) Geog. for 6 and 7 

Grades 4 

Math. — (a) Geometry. .4 

(b) Adv. Arith 4 



PROFESSIONAL 

Psychology 3 

Child Study ..3 

Hist, of Education 4 

S. M. — Special work for 

Rural School Prin- 
cipals 2 

Music 2 



ACADEMIC 

Eng. — Eng. Literature 4 

Hist.— (a) Mod. Eu. Hist._4 
(b) U. S. Hist, since 
1865 4 

Sci. — (a) Domestic Sci. ...4 

(b) Nature Study 4 

Math. — (a) Geometry 4 

(b) Algebra 4 



PROFESSIONAL 

Child Study 3 

Hist, of Education 4 

S. M.— School Discipline.. 2 

Primary Education 3 

Music... 2 



ACADEMIC 

Eng. — Teaching of Comp._4 
Hist. — Hist, for Grades 

4 to 7 4 

Sci. — (a) Domestic Sci 4 

(b) Nature Study 4 

Math. — (a) Geometry 4 

(b) Algebra ..4 



PROFESSIONAL 

Community Service 4 

Primary Education 3 

Drawing 4 

Music .—2 



*In G l , G 2 , and G 3 students may select any 12 hours work in the Academic and any 6 to 8 
hours in the Professional subjects. 

SUMMER TERM 

It is the aim of this school to render every service it may to 
advance the best interests of public education in our State. 
Realizing that many teachers engaged in the work wish to study 
after their schools close, that they may better equip themselves 
for their profession; also realizing that all the schools of the 
counties do not close at the same time, the Training School, to 
meet these conditions, will admit students at the beginning of 
any regular term, and in addition to this has established the 
Summer Term. 

The calendar year is divided into four terms, any three of 
which make a school year. The Summer Term is one of the 
four terms. 

Since those who attend the Summer Term have had experi- 
ence in teaching, a greater latitude is allowed in the selection 
of subjects. 

If there is sufficient demand for any of the courses offered 
in this catalog, the course is given. 



Note. — A bulletin on the Summer Term is issued each spring. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 



MATHEMATICS 

In all of the courses offered in Mathematics, the chief thing 
desired is the development of power — power to reason correctly, 
to calculate accurately and with a reasonable amount of speed, 
and power to express the work done in true and accurate state- 
ments. 

One of the special aims of the work offered in the Academic 
Course is to break down the strict lines of demarkation between 
Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry, and to connect these sub- 
jects more closely. 

Mathematics 1 is a review course in everyday arithmetic and 
in the elements of algebra. Snappy oral work receives special 
emphasis and much time is given to the solution of practical 
problems. The values of algebraic symbols in the solution of 
problems are made evident. Negative numbers are treated in 
a simple, practical way. 

Mathematics 2 is a course in general mathematics. It is gen- 
erally conceded that experimental or constructive geometry is 
a less difficult subject than formal algebra. This course deals 
only with this phase of geometry and shows the close relation- 
ships between algebra, geometry, and arithmetic. 

Mathematics 3 is course in which a good deal of training is 
given in algebraic technique. Factoring and fractions are 
taught as a means to an end not as an end in themselves. The 
solution of simultaneous simple equations is restricted almost 
entirely to equations in two unknowns. The study of the graph 
is taken up in this connection. 

Mathematics 4 deals especially with mensuration and with 
quadratic equations. The square, rectangle, circle, cylinder, 
prism, pyramid and cone are studied inductively and formulas 
derived. These formulas are applied to the solution of many 
practical problems. The right triangle and the equilateral 
triangle are taught as an application of the Pythagorean 
theorem and to furnish a motive for elementary work in square 
root and radicals. The four methods of solving quadratic 



24 East Carolina, Teachers Training School 

equations, by factoring, by completing the square, by the for- 
mula, and by the graph are taught and the special values of 
each method are brought out. 

Mathematics 5 is a course in formal geometry. Since so 
much preparatory work has been done for this course, the work 
proceeds rapidly. The close connection between geometry, 
algebra and arithmetic is not lost sight of. 

Mathematics 6 is a continuation course of Mathematics 5. 
A satisfactory completion of this course and those which pre- 
cede it is equivalent to the completion of High School Algebra 
through quadratics and Plane Geometry. 

Mathematics 7 is offered in the spring term of the first year 
of the Professional Course. General principles underlying the 
teaching of Arithmetic in the elementary school are studied. 
These principles are applied to the teaching of 5th grade arith- 
metic. The content matter of 5th grade arithmetic is reviewed, 
supplemented, and enriched. 

Mathematics 8 deals with the teaching of arithmetic in 
grades 4 to 6. A course of study for each of these grades is 
carefully worked out. Much time is given to oral arithmetic, 
and a great deal of time is given to making and solving real 
problems suitable for these three grades. 

Mathematics 9 deals with arithmetic for the 7th grade. The 
practical applications of percentage receive special emphasis. 
How to Teach Arithmetic by Projects is developed concretely 
and not taught theoretically. 

ENGLISH 

It is the purpose of the English Department to develop in the 
students an understanding and appreciation of literature, a love 
of reading, and an intelligent use of the English language, both 
in writing and speaking. 

In the professional years the general aim of training the stu- 
dents so that they will be efficient teachers of English in the 
grades is always kept in mind, as well as the idea that English 
is a subject that is the tool of all other subjects. In the first year 
emphasis is laid on principles underlying literature and com- 
position, and in the second year these principles are applied 
to the actual work in the grades. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 25 

The Academic courses, from 1 through 6, are the equivalent 
of the last years of the high school course. Classics of the same 
grade are used and a degree of proficiency in hoth technique and 
thought work in composition equal to that demanded hy the 
high school is required. 

In the first professional year, courses 7 through 9, a careful 
study is made of the common types of literature, paying especial 
attention to their organization, values, and the tangible things 
that can be taught, as well as to develop in the students the power 
to interpret the intangible, those things that cannot be taught 
directly. These types are the short story, the novel, the simple 
essay, biography, the play, the narrative poem, the nature poem 
and the poem of strong emotional appeal. The composition 
work includes the various forms in use in everyday life. Only 
sufficient rhetoric is given to enable the students to understand 
better the literature studied and to write with greater facility. 
A brief course in grammar is given for the purpose of reviewing 
the essentials and for getting a modern point of view of the 
subject. 

In the second-year professional courses, 10 and 11, the work 
is confined to the actual work of the grades, using only the ma- 
terial used in the grades. The work in literature in grades four 
and five centers around the story, with the hero story as the 
type, and around the simple nature poem. Language is con- 
sidered from two points of view : as a tool by means of which one 
can get thought from the printed page and as a tool for expres- 
sion with both tongue and hand. 

The last term the work in literature is spent on how to or- 
ganize and present complete classics, the longer units, as the 
story of purely literary merit, the narrative poem with plot, the 
easy novel of adventure, biographical sketches based on the hero 
story, and the easy play in the place of the dramatization of the 
story. How to get the children to form good habits of reading 
and what to encourage them to read are considered of impor- 
tance. In the composition work the time is devoted to the two 
topics : how to vitalize writing so that it will not be considered 
drudgery, and how to secure correctness of form at the same 
time. 

In grammar, stress is laid on what to teach and what not to 
teach, and how to present the subject so that the children will 



26 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

see that it is necessary to the understanding of the sentence, and 
not a mere enumeration of abstractions. 

The students of this class prepare the copy for the departments 
of the Training School Quarterly. This grows directly out of 
their life in the school and in their work in the Model School. 
This furnishes an excellent motive in English work. 

SPELLING 

All students are given a test in spelling on the first Saturday 
of the Fall Term. Those who spell ninety out of the hundred 
familiar words in this test are excused from further work 
in spelling. Those who do not pass this test are required to 
take spelling for one term, or longer, if necessary. A test is 
given at the end of each term. 

HISTOET 

The chief aims of the work done in the History Department 
are two : first, to give such knowledge and training as will en- 
able students to think intelligently upon the public questions and 
to become more useful American citizens ; second, to give better 
training in the method of teaching history. 

(a) Courses 1 to 3, inclusive, are offered in the First-year 
Academic, five hours per week. The subject is the history of 
the Greeks and Eomans and of the early Mediaeval period. 

(b) Courses 4 to 6, inclusive, are offered in the Second-year 
Academic, five hours per week. The history of the later Me- 
diaeval period and Modern Europe is given. 

In both courses offered in the Academic years the emphasis 
is placed on those phases of the human world and life of other 
times that can be, by comparison and contrast, connected with 
the life today. 

(c) Courses 7 and 8 are offered in the First-year Profes- 
sional, three hours per week for two terms. This is the history 
of America with special emphasis upon those events that reach 
into the past for causes and into the future for effects. 

(d) Course 9 is offered in either North Carolina History or 
Civics, four hours per week for one term. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 27 

(e) Courses 10 and 11 are offered in the Second-year Pro- 
fessional, three hours a week for two terms. Teaching of history 
in the grammar grades is the object of this course. 

(f) The history offered in the One-year Course for Rural 
Schools is based upon the State adopted text, Our Republic. 
For outline of this course, see pages 20 and 21. 

CIYICS 

The course in Civics is intended to give the essential forms 
of government now found among civilized nations, with especial 
emphasis upon the government of our own Nation and State. 

SCIENCE 

It is the one purpose of our science courses to train for in- 
telligent living and intelligent service. 

This involves a thorough knowledge of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of our several subjects of study, a knowledge of the facts 
which make these principles clear, and a knowledge of the 
science facts necessary for daily life. 

Inasmuch as the goal of instruction is not reached until the 
individual has acquired the power to use the knowledge he has 
gained, power to work independently of the teacher, power to 
think accurately and clearly, these features are stressed and 
opportunity is constantly offered to apply the knowledge gained 
to the practical and everyday affairs of life. 

Our science courses lead up to, prepare for and culminate in 
the subjects most closely related to the lives of the people of 
North Carolina — 

(a) Geography — A study of the earth in its relation to life, its 
control over life and the way life responds to the various geographic 
factors; and the way man adjusts himself to and utilizes the factors 
of his environment best to meet his needs. 

(b) Elementary Biology — (1) A study of those common-sense, val- 
uable, and interesting things about plants and animals that are most 
closely related to the human life. (2) A study of the human 
mechanism to the end that it may receive more intelligent care and 
attention and result in healthier, happier and more efficient living. 

(c) Agriculture — To assist us in solving the problem, "Who can 
raise the best plant or animal?" and bring to the problem and its 



28 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

solution common sense, good judgment, and a knowledge of the 
principles which underlie efficient agriculture — the greatest and most 
important occupation of man — so as to dignify it and bring it up to 
the rightful place it should hold not only in the minds of those who 
engage in this occupation, but in the minds of all others. 

(d) Seasonal Laboratory — For the purpose of giving practice in 
the doing of those things in applied biology and agriculture that 
need to be done in every community in the season when each 
especially needs attention; e. g. Pruning and Spraying; making and 
caring for home vegetable gardens and flower beds; propagating 
and transplanting plants; selection and care of seed; testing seed 
vitality; poultry work; tomato club work, etc. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

The chief aim of the courses in Home Economics is to help 
the students to become more efficient workers with foods and 
clothing materials in order that they may become better teachers 
of these subjects. 

It is the purpose of the course in cooking to help the students 
to gain a usable knowledge of the composition and preparation 
of food for the table. The meal is made the central idea, and 
much time is spent on the planning, preparation, and serving of 
meals. The ultimate aim is to improve the selection, care, and 
preparation of food in the home. 

The course in sewing is designed to give a general knowledge 
of garment-making. Practice is given in both hand and machine 
sewing. In the making of the various garments, attention is 
paid to the study of patterns, their interpretation and use; and 
of seams and finishes. In the spring term some time is given to 
the study of fabrics. Each girl is required to know how to make 
every kind of garment she wears and to make her graduation 
dress. 

PEDAGOGY 

Pedagogy is an essential department of a Teachers' Train- 
ing School. The instruction in this department deals with the 
fundamental principles of education; the relation of the differ- 
ent branches of knowledge to one another and to the mind, and 
the method by which the human powers may be trained. It 
deals with the theory and the practice of teaching. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 29 

The Department of Pedagogy in this school devotes some 
time to a study of the fundamental laws of mind, that the stu- 
dents may utilize their knowledge of these mental activities in 
their own study. This includes within its scope a study of 
Child Development and How to Teach Children to Study. 

The Teaching process is emphasized with the aim of enabling 
the students to understand and make a practical application of 
the principles involved in good teaching and the methods em- 
ployed to realize the goal in the process of education. 

PRIMARY EDUCATION 

This course covers the work of the first three grades and con- 
sists of a careful study of all primary subjects, aided by obser- 
vation of work done in these grades. The special method con- 
sists in selection, adaptation, and development of subject-matter 
with regard to the fundamental principles underlying the learn- 
ing process. Throughout the course, the inter-relation of sub- 
jects is given special emphasis. 

Pedagogy 7 — Reading and the related subjects, spelling and writ- 
ing. A study of the principles underlying the reading process, 
through selected readings, discussions, observations and lesson- 
plans, made and taught. Special attention is given to reading for 
beginners, showing the natural development of reading power. The 
value and relative place of phonics is here treated. 

Pedagogy 8 — (a) Primary Language — Selection and organization 
of subject-matter emphasized. Illustrative lessons developed. Stories 
selected, studied and told by students. The subject of dramatization 
is treated in this connection. 

(b) Number — The formation of a course of study together with 
method of developing. 

Pedagogy 9 — (a) Primary History — A study of home-life forms 
a basis for the study of primitive life and primary geography. 
Throughout this course the value of correlation is emphasized. 

(b) Nature Study — The working out of a few live problems which 
will develop interest in nature. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE WORK 

Practice Teaching — one term. 

Required of all students of the regular professional course, 
Senior Year. 

The aim of this course is to give students skill in connecting 
theory and practice through this direct contact with child-nature 



30 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

and its needs. The work consists of observations followed by 
discussion, lesson-plans made and criticised, supervised teach- 
ing and daily conferences. The work of both critic-teachers and 
supervisors is constructive rather than destructive. 

Most of the observation and practice teaching is done in the 
Model School, which contains seven grades and is a part of the 
public school system of Greenville. Hereafter the Joyner School, 
a typical, three-teacher rural school, will be used also for this 
work. The City Superintendent and the County Superintendent 
are members of this faculty. Thus various types of schools are 
brought into direct connection with East Carolina Teachers 
Training School. 

SCHOOL MANAGEMENT 

It is the purpose of this course to discuss the various prob- 
lems confronting the teacher in the organization, the conduct 
and the management of the school. It proposes in addition to 
the treatment of methods and their skillful use to emphasize the 
practical and vital topics in school management in such man- 
ner that it may aid the teachers to fill that wider function of 
training pupils for the duties, responsibilities and obligations of 
life. It is made as practical as possible in order to meet the 
conditions and needs of the school of today. 

DBAWING 

The courses in drawing are planned to give all students who 
wish to teach Primary and Grammar grades a practical knowl- 
edge of drawing. 

The purpose is to train the mind, the eye and the hand to 
work together — to cultivate habits of thought and observation 
and to create an appreciation of the beautiful. 

The courses are adapted to the needs of the student-teacher, 
both as a learner of the principles of drawing and as a pros- 
pective teacher of the subject. 

In the second-year Academic Course Drawing is not taught; 
in its place the students are given a course in basketry. 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 31 

MUSIC 

Two courses in music are offered: 

Public School Music 
The aim of Public School Music in this school is twofold : 

First: To cultivate a genuine love of music in the students 
through the spontaneous singing of beautiful music and to de- 
velop the musical mind through the study of musical struc- 
ture. 

Second: To inspire the student-teachers with a desire to 
arouse in children their natural love of music and to train the 
student-teachers in such a manner that they may be prepared to 
do this musical work for the children of North Carolina. 

In working out this twofold aim the Public School Music 
Course offers the students exceptional opportunities in inspira- 
tional singing, the cultivation of the musical voice, development 
of rhythm through folk-dances and singing games, sight-reading 
and musical appreciation. 

From the introduction of Public School Music in our school 
emphasis has been put upon the special value of inspirational 
singing, and the development of rhythm in this music work, as 
a permanent and vital basis for the upbuilding of a musical life 
in the children of the State. 

Piano 

The value of this subject in a teacher training school lies, first, 
in the use a teacher can make of her piano training in fostering 
community spirit, and, second, in the need of our communities 
for school teachers who can also give piano lessons. 

Students are offered a thorough course in the technique and 
interpretation of piano music. 

First Year 

Major scales — hands separately. 

Biehl — Elements of Piano Playing. 

Gurlitt — Technic and Melody — Bk. 1. 

Duvernoy — Ecole Primaire. 

Kuhner — Bk. 1 or studies equivalent. 

Easy pieces. 

Class in Elements of Ear Training, one period a week. 



32 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Second Year 

Major and Minor scales — hands separately. 

Biehl — Elements of Piano Playing 

or 

Hanon — The Virtuoso Pianist. 

Kuhner— Bk. 2. 

Burgmuller — op 100. 

Easier Clementi Sonatinas 

or 

Studies equivalent. 

Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Class in Elementary Theory, one period a week. 

Third Year 

Major and Minor scales. 

Hanon — The Virtuoso Pianist. 

Sonatinas. 

Heller op. 47 

or 

Studies equivalent. 

Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Class in History of Music, one period a week. 

Fourth Year 

Major and Minor scales. 

Hanon — The Virtuoso Pianist. 

Easier Sonatas of Haydn and Mozart. 

Heller — op. 46. 

Bach — Prelude and Fugues. 

Bach Album 

or 

Studies equivalent. 

Pieces of corresponding difficulty. 

Practice Teaching under supervision, twice a week, for one 
term. 

Pupils are required to play at the Practice Recitals which 
are held every two weeks throughout the year. 




THE JOYNER SCHOOL 



East Carolina Teachers Training ScJwol 33 

Piano may be taken as an elective : 

(a) In the first and second years of the Academic Course for 
Public School Music and Drawing. 

(b) In the Junior year for Science 8, 10, and 12. 

No student will be given credit for Piano unless she has com- 
pleted the first and second years work offered by this school, or 
a course equivalent thereto. 

Students may take third or fourth year piano work as ar 
elective, but credit will not be given unless the prescribed course 
is completed. 

Each year some who have applied for piano lessons have been 
denied because the number that can be accommodated is limited, 
therefore those who wish to take lessons would do well to put in 
their application early. 



EXPENSES 



FALL, WNTEE, AND SPEING TEEMS 

Board in the dormitories $ 130.50 

Laundry 19.50 

For the use of text-books 5.00 

Light and heat 15.00 

Medical and Hospital fee 5.00 

Dormitory fee 5.00 



Total $ 180.00 

*Literary tuition $60.00 

Piano 60.00 

For students who sign the agreement to teach, and who do not 
take Piano, payments will be due in advance, as follows : 

September 24, 1920 $ 60.00 

January 1, 1921 60.00 

March 16, 1921 60.00 

Total $ 180.00 

If tuition is paid (Literary or Piano) one-third of the amount 
is due in advance on the above mentioned dates. 

SUMMEE TEEM, 1921 

Board, room, light, and laundry may be paid by the month. 
These expenses apply only to those students living in the dormi- 
tories. All others pay only the registration fee. There will be 
no reduction or refund of the registration fee. 

Registration fee $ 5.00 

Board, room, light and laundry, per term, eight weeks 40.00 

Board, room, light and laundry for the Summer term may be paid 
for by the month at $20.00 per month of four weeks, due in advance. 



*There is no charge for tuition for those who agree to teach for two years. To 
all others there will be a charge of $60.00 per year. 

Note. — Students taking Piano will pay for the sheet music used. 

Students will pay for hack hire, transfer of baggage, and stationery used. These 
items are not included in expenses as given above. 



STUDENTS ATTENDING EAST CAROLINA TRAIN- 
ING SCHOOL JUNE 9, 1919, TO JUNE 9, 1920 



Name Address County 

Albritton, Gay Kinston Lenoir 

Alderman, Estelle Magnolia Duplin 

Alexander, Reba Columbia Tyrrell 

Allen, Rachel Seaboard Northampton 

Alhgood, Alice M Hamilton Martin 

Alston, Annie Lou Henderson Vance 

Alston, Margaret \ Henderson Vance 

Andrews, Iva Kinston Lenoir 

Ange, Eva Gladys Jamesville Martin 

Anthony, Annie Lee Hamilton Martin 

Arnold, Gladys New Bern Craven 

Arthur, Annie , Mariner .Onslow 

Baggette, Essie Windsor Bertie 

Bahnson, Elizabeth Farmington .Davie 

Bahnson, Helen Farmington '.'. ] Davie 

Ballance, Gladys Swan Quarter Hyde 

Ballance, Margaret Lake Landing .Hyde 

Ballance, Zuma Maple Currituck 

Banks, Alice Raleigh Wake 

Banks, Ruby A Expo, Va '.[ [Norfolk 

Barnes, Bessie Creswell Washington 

Barnes, Callie W Creswell Washington 

Barnes, Georgia Albert Lillington Harnett 

Barwick, Mattie Lou Ft. Barnwell Craven 

Bass, Elizabeth Wilson .Wilson 

Bass, Myrtie Bentonville .Johnston 

Bass, Vivian Lucama Wilson 

Batts, Alma R Hallsville Duplin 

Batts, Mary Rocky Mount .' .Edgecombe 

Baucom, Annie Laurie Raleigh ' Wake 

Baum, Gladys M Fairfield, Hyde 

Baxter, Vera Edenton .Chowan 

Beaman, Llewellyn Clinton " Sampson 

Beaman, Sue Stantonsburg Greene 

Beacham, Maybelle Aurora Beaufort 

Beasley, Minnie L Sneads Ferry '.'. Onslow 

Belcher, Julia Parmele Martin 

Benson, Nellie Battleboro .' .'Edgecombe 

Best, Alice Goldsboro Wayne 

Bishop, Bessie Bath ' Beaufort 

Blackley, Madge Durham '. Durham 

Blackmore, Nora Warsaw Duplin 

Blanchard, Mabel Trotville Gates 

Blanchard, Sarah Margaret . . Sunbury .......[[... Gates 

Bond, Lucy Rascoe Windsor '. Bertie 

Bonner, Audry Bonnerton Beaufort 

Boone, Lois Castalia Franklin 



36 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Name Address County 

Borden, Eunice H Goldsboro Wayne 

Boseman, Winnie Enfield Halifax 

Boswell, Bonnie Black Creek Wilson 

Bray, Attie Elizabeth. Hertford Perquimans 

Brickhouse, Mattie Columbia Tyrrell 

Bridgers, Nettie Conway Northampton 

Britt, Urma W Enfield Halifax 

Britton, Lillian V Woodville Bertie 

Brock, Mary A Mamie Currituck 

Brooks, Mary Greenville Pitt 

Brothers, Ethel Oriental Pamlico 

Brown, Elizabeth Woodland Hertford 

Brown, Emma Jane Rich Square Northampton 

Brown, Fannie Bett Greenville Pitt 

Brown, Mamie E New Bern Craven 

Brown, Mary E Chinquapin Onslow 

Brown, Ruth Greenville Pitt 

Bryan, Jamie J Greenville Pitt 

Bryant, Ellen Rich Square Northampton 

Bulluck, Leonda Atlantic Carteret 

Bunch, Goldie Tyner Chowan 

Bunch, Ida Richardson Tyner Chowan 

Bunch, Sarah S Tyner Chowan 

Burbage, Miriam Como Hertford 

Burbage, Nellie Bath Beaufort 

Burden, Blanche Aulander Bertie 

Burgess, H. Wilma Old Trap Camden 

Burris, Rosa Greenville Pitt 

Burton, Vistula Maple Hill Pender 

Butler, Docia Bladenboro Bladen 

Butler, Marion Rocky Mount Nash 

Butts, Mamie Heathsville Halifax 

Butts, Viola Heathsville Halifax 

Byrd, Elva Bunnlevel Harnett 

Byrd, Mary Calypso Duplin 

Byrum, Lillian Harrellsville Bertie 

Byrum, Lois Harrellsville Bertie 

Cain, Johnnie White Oak Bladen 

Caine, Ora Lee White Oak Bladen 

Canady, Aleathia Bath Beaufort 

Cannon, Blanche Hertford Perquimans 

Carlton, Lucille Snow Hill Greene 

Carver, Myrtice Woodsdale Person 

Carr, Ollie Mae Teacheys Duplin 

Carraway, W. B Farmville Greene 

Carroll, Annie Greenville Pitt 

Cauley, Mary Kinston Lenoir 

Cauley, Pearl Kinston Lenoir 

Cavenaugh, Annie Richlands Onslow 

Chamberlain, Gertrude Sanford Lee 

Chappell, Nona Belvidere Perquimans 

Clark, Annie Chicod Pitt 

Clayton, Lena Roxbcro Person 

Clements, Ethel Stancell Northampton 

Clifton, Frances Faison Sampson 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 37 

Name Address County 

Cloninger, Grace Newton Catawba 

Clouse, Robbie Henderson Vance 

Coley, Beulah Rocky Mount Nash 

Collins, Estelle Ayden Pitt 

Connelly, Mattie Morganton Burke 

Connor, Mary Dover Craven 

Cooke, Eva Louisburg Franklin 

Corbett, Florence Macclesfield Edgecombe 

Corbett, Mary Ivanhoe Sampson 

Cox, Carey C Winterville Pitt 

Cox, Leona Winterville Pitt 

Credle, Ada M Swan Quarter Hyde 

Credle, Sopbia Swan Quarter Hyde 

Crinkley. Mary Andrews Macon Warren 

Croom, Helen Kinston Lenoir 

Croom, Rebecca Kinston Lenoir 

Dale, Abbie Morganton Burke 

Dale, Texie Morganton Burke 

Daniel, Mary Pelham Caswell 

Daugbtridge, Ruby Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Daugbtry, Bessie Clinton Sampson 

Daughtry, Mary Clinton Sampson 

Davenport, Mary Batb Beaufort 

Davis, Olga Evelyn Warsaw Duplin 

Davis, Virginia Sneads Ferry Onslow 

Dawson, Allyne Stantonsburg Greene 

Dawson, Lillie Mae Kinston Lenoir 

Dean, Irene Oxford Granville 

Dean, Ruth Oxford Granville 

Dillon, Lillian Columbia Tyrrell 

Dixon, Bertha Rose Hill Duplin 

Dixon, Hannah Greenville Pitt 

Dixon, Jennie Mae Elm City Wilson 

Dobson, Ruth Atkinson Pender 

Draughan, Aileen Bowden Duplin 

Dupree, Mildred Celia Greenville Pitt 

Earley, Effie Ahoskie Hertford 

Early, Sallie Aulander Bertie 

Edge, Flarra White Oak Bladen 

Elks, Nannie Lee Greenville Pitt 

Elliott, Helen Rich Square Northampton 

Elliott, Thelma Hertford Perquimans 

Ellis, Agnes Kittrell Vance 

Ellis, Lottie Winterville Pitt 

Eure, Geneva Gates Gates 

Evans, Carrie Greenville Pitt 

Evans, Christine Greenville Pitt 

Evans. Wessie Tyner Chowan 

Everett, Daisy Kinston Lenoir 

Everett, Millie Holly Ridge Onslow 

Everette, Siddie Pearl Nashville Nash 

Exum, Bettie Bruce Greenville Pitt 

Ezzell, Ruby Grifton Pitt 



38 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Name Address County 

Faircloth, Lila D Jessie Cumberland 

F arabow, Blanche Stem Granville 

Finch, Mary Anne Henderson Vance 

Fisher, Eunice Roseboro Sampson 

Fisher, Nellie Roseboro Sampson 

Fitzgerald, Caroline Micro Johnston 

Flanagan, Blanche Farmville Pitt 

Fleetwood, Katie Edenton Chowan 

Fleetwood, Lenna Edenton Chowan 

Flythe, Jessie Roxobel Bertie 

Forbes, Fannie May Fountain Edgecombe 

Forbes, Mary Jane Farmville Pitt 

Fordham, Lena Deep Run Lenoir 

Fordham, Lucile Kinston Lenoir 

Forehand, Thelma Colerain Bertie 

Forrest, Ida Vanceboro Craven 

Fountain, Sudie Chinquapin Duplin 

Foxwell, Linie Edenton Chowan 

Frazier, Inez A Oxford Granville 

Frazier, Senia Swansboro Onslow 

Fuller, Erne Creedmoor Wake 

Furlough, Caroline Creswell Washington 

Fuqua, Irma M Corbett Caswell 

Futrell, Beatrice Conway Northampton 

Garris, Ruby Ayden Pitt 

Gaskill, Frances Blounts Creek Beaufort 

Gatewood, Mary Danville, Va Caswell 

Gatling, Marie .Windsor Bertie 

Gatling, Mary L Ahoskie Hertford 

Gerrard, Armecia Blounts Creek Beaufort 

Gibbs, Agnes Middletown Hyde 

Gilbert, Esther Kerr Sampson 

Gillam, Helen E Windsor Bertie 

Gillette, Sallie Duck Creek Onslow 

Gilliam, Clara Ellen Louisburg Franklin 

Glenn, Mary Ann Durham Durham 

Goode, Clara W Woodard Bertie 

Grady, Lillian Seven Springs Duplin 

Graham, Janie Fayetteville Cumberland 

Gresham, Inez Beulaville Duplin 

Gresham, Leone Beulaville Duplin 

Grice, Alice Kenly Johnston 

Gurganus, Eva Bath Beaufort 

Guthrie, Ida B Chocowinity Beaufort 

Hamilton, Ethel Chalybeate Springs Harnett 

Hardy Alice Norlina Warren 

Hardy, Ethel Seven Springs Lenoir 

Harper, Annie Rocky Mount Nash 

Harper, Hoppie Kinston Lenoir 

Harrell, Aeliene Eure Gates 

Harrell, Ennie Mae Windsor Bertie 

Harrell, Mary Scotland Neck Halifax 

Harrell, Millie Colerain Bertie 

Harrell, Nannie B Windsor Bertie 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 39 

Name Address County 

Harris, Blanche Pungo Beaufort 

Harris, Katye Roxboro Person 

Harris, Mabel Roxboro Person 

Harriss, Pearl Stokes Pitt 

Hart, Matilda Virginia Tarboro Edgecombe 

Harvey, Elizabeth Washington Beaufort 

Haskins, Lois Oriental Pamlico 

Hawkins, Thelma Dover Craven 

Hayes, Lucie Hollister Halifax 

Hayes, Margaret Elizabeth. . .Louisburg Franklin 

Helms, Mabel Waxhaw Union 

Henderson, Bessie New Bern Craven 

Henderson, Vera Lee Hubert Onslow 

Hensley, Margueritte Bald Creek Yancey 

Hewitt, Rachel E Catherine Lake Onslow 

Hobbs, Cleone Clinton Sampson 

Hobbs, Elizabeth Belvidere Gates 

Hodges, Marion Dover Craven 

Hofler, Maude Gatesville Gates 

Holland, Ida Maysville Onslow 

Holland, Nellie Dare Washington Beaufort 

Holland, Ruby Silverdale Onslow 

Holloway, Elfye Durham Durham 

Hollowell, Jennie L Tyner Chowan 

Hollowell, Laura Tyner Chowan 

Hollowell, Minnie A Ransonville Beaufort 

Hollowell, Orene Tyner Chowan 

Holmes, Hattie Farmville Pitt 

Hooks, Rose Fremont Wayne 

Horrell, Myrtle Ellen Atkinson Pender 

Horton, Bessie Ahoskie Hertford 

Horton, Lanie Bunn Franklin 

House, Bernice Parmele Pitt 

Howard, Carrie Miller Pink Hill Duplin 

Howell, Gladys Ahoskie Hertford 

Hughes, Flora New Bern Craven 

Hunt, Clyde Stantonsburg Greene 

Hunt, Mattie Stantonsburg Greene 

Hunter, Pattie A Apex Wake 

Hurst, Mary A Duck Creek Onslow 

Hurst, Minnie Warren Maysville Jones 

Inman, Sallie Fairmont Robeson 

Jackson, Fannie L Kinston Lenoir 

James, Annie L Bethel Pitt 

James, Gwendolyn Roper Washington 

Jarvis, Lula Scranton Hyde 

Jenkins, Grace Hertford Perquimans 

Jenkins, Sarah Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Jenkins, Trixie Jacksonville Onslow 

Jennette, Thelma Lake Landing Hyde 

Jernigan, Mary Ahoskie Hertford 

Jessup, Annie Winfall Perquimans 

Jessup, Louise Ruskin Bladen 

Johnson, Azile Kerr Sampson 



40 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Name Address County 

Johnson, Carrie V Ivanhoe Bladen 

Johnson, Lillian Rich Square Northampton 

Johnson, Nonie St. Pauls .Robeson 

Johnson, Virginia Rose Hill Duplin 

Johnston, M. Addie Greenville Pitt 

Johnston, Christine Greenville Pitt 

Johnston, Fannie B Littleton Halifax 

Johnston, Kate Littleton Halifax 

Jolliff, Manola Belvidere Perquimans 

Jolliff, Wilma Belvidere Perquimans 

Jones, Agnes Durham Durham 

Jones, Aileen Snow Hill Greene 

Jones, Bedie Oxford Granville 

Jones, Kathleen Swansboro Onslow 

Jones, Lula Eureka Wayne 

Jones, Sallie Maie Edenton Chowan 

Jordan, Dora Lee Ransomville Beaufort 

Joyner, May Rocky Mount Nash 

Joyner, Minnie Vanceboro Craven 

Joyner, Nancy Rocky Mount Nash 

Joyner, Ruby Colerain Bertie 

Keel, Ola T Alliance Pamlico 

Kennedy, Kathleen Aulander Bertie 

Kiff, Joe Ahoskie Hertford 

Kittrell, Annie M Ayden Pitt 

Knight, Helen A Tarboro Edgecombe 

Koonce, Glenmoore Trenton Jones 

Kornegay, Kate Mt. Olive Wayne 

Lampley, Allie Wadesboro Anson 

Lancaster, Geneva Sharpsburg Edgecombe 

Lane, Myrtle Winfall Perquimans 

Langley, Emily Wilson Wilson 

Lanier, Eunice Hallsville Duplin 

Latham, Ophelia Washington Beaufort 

Laughinghouse, Weslie Chicod Pitt 

Lavender, Helen M Lake Landing Hyde 

Lawrence, Pattie Avoca Bertie 

Lee, Espie Reelsboro Pamlico 

Lee, Flora Bentonville Johnston 

Lee, Mamie Mozel Dunn Harnett 

Lee, Nellie Reelsboro Pamlico 

Lee, Vann Hollister Halifax 

Link, Beatrice Durham Orange 

Linton, Thelma Richmond, Va Henrico 

Little, Ferol Stokes Pitt 

Liverman, Mattie Roper Washington 

Liverman, Ruth Columbia Tyrrell 

Lowe, Mary Lee Parkersburg Sampson 

Lowry, Marie Weeksville Pasquotank 

Loy, Ruth Roxboro Person 

Loyd, Pearle Norlina Warren 

Lucas, Elizabeth Whitmell . . .Enfield Halifax 

Lunsford, Vera Roxboro Person 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 41 

Name Address County 

Madry, Ethel Scotland Neck Halifax 

Manning, Lillie J Bethel Pitt 

Marriner, Cora Leigh Roper Washington 

Martin, Gertrude Janeiro Pamlico 

Martin, Roland Conetoe Edgecombe 

Massengill, Loma Bentonville Johnston 

Matthews, Edith Clinton Sampson 

Matthews, Katie Lee Clinton Sampson 

Matthews, Mamie L Rosemary Halifax 

Matthews, Mary Catherine . . .Goldsboro Wayne 

Matthews, Pauline Spring Hope Nash 

Maupin, Mildred Culpeper, Va Culpeper 

Maxwell, Celia V Pink Hill Duplin 

McArthur, Ethel Greenville Pitt 

McCotter, Mildred V Cash Corner Pamlico 

McDuffee, Lula Ruskin Bladen 

McGowan, Metta Swan Quarter Hyde 

McGowan, Mildred Swan Quarter Hyde 

McGuire, Edna Yanceyville Caswell 

Mclver, Ellen Mebane Orange 

Mclver, Mary Mebane Orange 

Meekins, Edith Stumpy Point Dare 

Meekins, Nannie Stumpy Point Dare 

Melvin, Eugenia Roseboro Cumberland 

Mercer, Carrie E Fountain Edgecombe 

Mercer, Lula Hallsville Duplin 

Mercer, Ruby Fountain Edgecombe 

Midgett, Carrie Hubert Onslow 

Miller, Lorena Manteo Dare 

Millis, Creasie Sneads Ferry Onslow 

Mizell, Annie Plymouth Washington 

Mizell, Janice Windsor Bertie 

Mizelle, Mattie Jamesville Martin 

Modlin, Daisy Ahoskie Hertford 

Moore, Elva D Bath Beaufort 

Moore, Geraldine Scotland Neck Halifax 

Moore, Hattie I Clinton Sampson 

Moore, Joe Reba Macclesfield Edgecombe 

Moore, Lucy Falkland Pitt 

Moore, Myrtle Durants Neck Perquimans 

Moore, Ollie Scotland Neck Halifax 

Morris, Nancy J Maysville Onslow 

Morse, Myrtie E South Framingham Mass 

Morton, Bertha I Jacksonville Onslow 

Moss, Ellen Norfolk, Va Norfolk 

Munford, Katie Greenville Pitt 

Murray, Blanche Lake Landing Hyde 

Murray, Janie Lake Landing Hyde 

Muse, Bonnie Cameron Moore 

Nelson, Lillie Mae Vanceboro Craven 

Newell, Pauline Macon Warren 

Noblin, Sallie B Goldsboro Wayne 

Norman, Mary Perkins Greenville Pitt 



42 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Name Address County 

O'Briant, Mary Vann Elm City Wilson 

Odom, Alma Rich. Square Northampton 

Osborne, Mae D Richmond Virginia 

Outlaw, Rachel Seven Springs Duplin 

Overstreet, Sue Bet Enfield Halifax 

Packer, Ella Mae Clinton Sampson 

Page, Lizzie Fairmont Robeson 

Palmer, Bertha Weeksville Pasquotank 

Pappendick, Nell B Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Parker, Audry Seaboard Northampton 

Parker, Audry S Winton Hertford 

Parker, Pearl Clinton Sampson 

Patrick, Johnnye Snow Hill Greene 

Payne, Calsie Annie Stumpy Point Dare 

Pearson, Sarah E Black Creek Wilson 

Peele, Erma Aulander Bertie 

Peele, Liliah Hatteras Dare 

Peel, Myrtle Williamston Martin 

Peel, Rhoda Williamston Martin 

Pelletier, Gladys Stella Carteret 

Perry, Allie Colerain Bertie 

Perry, Annie Lou Durham Durham 

Perry, Inez Tyner Chowan 

Perry, Mattie Lou Hertford Perquimans 

Phelps, Emma La Grange Greene 

Phelps, May W Merry Hill Bertie 

Phelps, Rosalie Belhaven Beaufort 

Phthisic, Lillie L Belvidere Perquimans 

Pigford, Virginia Faison Duplin 

Pippin, Mildred Farmville Greene 

Pittard, Camilla Hester Granville 

Pittman, Ethel Wilson Wilson 

Porter, Ruby Kelly Bladen 

Powell, Bertha Aulander Hertford 

Powell, Mattie E Phoenix Brunswick 

Prescott, Pearle Aurora Beaufort 

Pridgen, Mamie N. C Speed Edgecombe 

Privott, Maebelle Tyner Chowan 

Purser, Lillian Rae Chocowinity Beaufort 

Purser, Lydia Vanceboro Pitt 

Purvis, Lillian Scotland Neck Halifax 

Quinerly, Annie Belle Greenville Pitt 

Quinerly, Bert Greenville Pitt 

Ratcliffe, Martha Reidsville Rockingham 

Raynor, Gussie Maple Hill Pender 

Read, Mary Ellen Garysburg Northamtpon 

Reed, Mildred Hertford Perquimans 

Rice, Myrtice B Black Creek Wilson 

Rice, Octavia White Oak Bladen 

Rimmer, Viola Hurdle Mills Person 

Rivers, Mabel Clinton Sampson 

Rogers, Kathleen Hose Hill Duplin 

Rogers, Nina Roxboro Person 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 43 

Name Address County 

Rogers, Noma Roxboro Person 

Rogers, Rosalie Durham Durham 

Rose, Julia S Bentonville Johnston 

Rountree, H. Ellie Tyner -.Chowan 

Rowe, Julia F Stonewall Pamlico 

Rowell, Eula Phoenix Brunswick 

Rowland, Etta Rich Square Northampton 

Ruffin, Callie Rocky Mount Edgecombe 

Sallenger, Margaret Windsor Bertie 

Sanders, Pauline Four Oaks Johnston 

Satterfield, Lillie Bruce Pitt 

Satterfield, Reba Roxboro Person 

Saunders, Mattie Tyner Chowan 

Savage, Annie Laurie Speed Edgecombe 

Savage, Bettie Ruth Rose Hill Duplin 

Sawyer, Zoe Eure Gates 

Sears, Katie Young Middlesex Nash 

Selby, Rosa M Lake Landing Hyde 

Shaw, Kate "White Oak Bladen 

Sidbury, Margaret Scotts Hill Pender 

Simpson, Elsie Trotville Gates 

Smith, Agnes Eden ton Chowan 

Smith, Eula Roseboro Cumberland 

Smith, Irene E Reidsville Rockingham 

Smith, Katherine Bath Beaufort 

Smith, Lallie Henderson Franklin 

Smith, Louise Davidson Cabarrus 

Southerland, Ethel Willard Pender 

Spain, Bettie Greenville Pitt 

Speir, Thelma Winterville Pitt 

Spence, Lillian Lee Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Spencer, Pearl G Englehard Hyde 

Spivey, Neola Ryland Chowan 

Squires, Ethel Kelly Bladen 

Stallings, Cornelia Pinetops Edgecombe 

Stephens, Minnie Love Oriental Pamlico 

Stewart, Helen J Manson Warren 

Stokes, Mamie Colerain Bertie 

Storey, Boyd C Conway Northampton 

Strassberger, Grace Douglassville Pennsylvania 

Straughn, Pearle Rowland Roberson 

Strickland, Nannie Spring Hope Nash 

Stubbs, Ada E Vanceboro Craven 

Sumner, Mary .Hertford Perquimans 

Summerlin, Lillie Mt. Olive Wayne 

Sumrell, Bernedyne Scotland Neck Halifax 

Sutton, Alice P Kinston Lenoir 

Sutton, Gretchen Kinston Lenoir 

Sutton, Thelma Kinston Lenoir 

Swindell, Alethia Creswell Washington 

Swindell, Lillian Lake Landing Hyde 

Swindell, Mildred Lake Landing Hyde 

Tarkenton, Eloise Woodard Bertie 

Tarkenton, Nellie Mackeys Washington 



44 East Carolina Teachers Training School 

Name Address County 

Tatum, Eva Louise Ruskin Bladen 

Taylor, Clara Rocky Mount Nash 

Taylor, Julia Wilson Wilson 

Tayloe, Myrtie Chocowinity Beaufort 

Teel, Vera Bell Greenville Pitt 

Teer, Carrie Teer Orange 

Thigpen, Willie Dudley Wayne 

Thomas, Lou Merry Hill Bertie 

Thomasson, Harriet P Stem Granville 

Thompson, Mildred Columbia Tyrrell 

Tillman, Mabel C Roxboro Person 

Todd, Clara Mildred Windsor Bertie 

Todd, Nora Aulander Bertie 

Tripp, Doris Blounts Creek Beaufort 

Tripp, Katherine Whichard Pitt 

Tucker, Myrtle R Greenville Pitt 

Turnage, Emily Bath Beaufort 

Tyndall, J. A Arapahoe Pamlico 

Tyree, Margienette Rocky Mount Nash 

Tyson, Janie Winterville Pitt 

Tyson, Mat Belle Parmville Pitt 

Valentine, Ada Spring Hope Nash 

Van Landingham, Chesson. . .Scotland Neck Halifax 

Vann, Mattie Murfreesboro Northampton 

Vaughan, Clare Virgilina Virginia 

Vaughan, Kathleen Ahoskie Hertford 

Vaughan, Mary Virgilina . Virginia 

Vause, Irma Rocky Mount Nash 

Venters, Annie Grimesland Pitt 

Vick, Debbie L Nashville Nash 

Vick, Mary Enfield Halifax 

Wade, Lula Leasburg Caswell 

Walker, Prances Union Ridge Caswell 

Wallace, Mary Lou Rose Hill Duplin 

Ward, Bertha Parmele Martin 

Ward, Cornie Edenton Chowan 

Ward, Emily Ryland Chowan 

Ward, Leola Nerrissa Onslow 

Ward, Lillie Belle Rose Hill . ., Duplin 

Ward, Norma Rose Hill Duplin 

Warren, Gladys Woodsdale Person 

Warren, Linda Greenville Pitt 

Waters, Clara Greenville Pitt 

Watson, Grizzell Greenville Pitt 

Watson, Helen T Wildwood Carteret 

Wells, Annie T Teacheys Duplin 

Wells, Hattie Teacheys Duplin 

Wells, Helen Teacheys Duplin 

West, Laura Kinston Lenoir 

West, Mittie Kinston Lenoir 

Wester, Zelma Pranklinton Franklin 

Westmoreland, Nora Goldsboro Wayne 

Whichard, Louise Whichard Pitt 

Whitfield, Mayme Kinston Lenoir 



East Carolina Teachers Training School 45 

Name Address County 

Whitehurst, Alice Greenville Pitt 

Whitt, Pinkie Roxboro Person 

Wicker, Helen L Henderson Vance 

VVilkins, Ruth Magnolia Duplin 

Wilkinson, Alice M Goldsboro Wayne 

Willey, Mary Enfield Halifax 

Williams, Delia Elizabeth City Pasquotank 

Williams, Rosa Belcross Camden 

Williams, Thelma E New Bern Craven 

Willoughby, Esther Fairmont Robeson 

Wilson, Elsie Castalia Franklin 

Wilson, Senora Tarboro Edgecombe 

Winslow, Irva G George Northampton 

Winslow, Sallie E Belvidere Perquimans 

Winstead, Leona M Richlands Onslow 

Wommack, Elmira Scotland Neck Halifax 

Wommack, Mabel Scotland Neck Halifax 

Wood, Anniebelle Hertford Perquimans 

Wood, Belle Hollister Halifax 

Woodard, Glennie Pamlico Pamlico 

Woodburn, Aleen Yorick -. Bladen 

Woodley, Callie Creswell Washington 

Woodlief, Metrice Kittrell Vance 

Woodlief, Rosalie Kittrell Vance 

Wooten, Vera Cameron Moore 

Worthington, Alma Winterville Pitt 

Worthington, Inabelle Winterville Pitt 

Worthington, Vermelle Winterville Pitt 

Wynne, Eva A.ulander Hertford 

Wynns, Earle Harrellsville Hertford 

Yelverton, Olzie Mae Eureka Wayne 

Zahnizer, Henrietta Greenville Pitt